Welcome!

Award-winning Chef Phyllis Segura has cooked for people in all walks of life both in the U.S. and E.U. Chef Phyllis has been cooking for special people since 2000.
She attended the Apicius Cooking School of Lorenzo de’Medici in Florence, Italy; received a James Beard Foundation scholarship; attended various New York cooking schools; and watched her grandmother very carefully.
As a personal and private chef Phyllis cooks for individual clients and offers cooking demonstrations regularly. She specializes in small elegant dinner parties, and intimate dinners - plated or buffet, weekday meals and private and group culinary instructions.
The chef prepares a wide variety of cuisines. Whereas a restaurant chef might have a specialty that is served daily, as a personal or private chef Segura applies her skills to the requirements and palates of her clients. Fresh and seasonal ingredients make the best dishes. She is not shy with herbs and spices and will go out of her way to source ingredients.

Vegetarian, Vegan, Macrobiotic, Kosher, grain-free, dairy-free, gluten-free, blood type, diabetic and other special diets are available. Chef prefers to use organic, pesticide and antibiotic free, non-GMO and local products as much as possible.
Consultations with nutritionists are recommended for special needs and diets for proper guidelines.

References and a rate sheet are available. She currently lives in Saugerties, NY.
In 2013 she offered cooking classes in her home kitchen in Spencertown,NY www.reddoorcookingworkshop.blogspot.com

Send an email: info@cookingontheriver.com

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Saturday, April 22, 2006

SORREL AND SCHAV

Wonderful herb, Sorrel. You plant it. It grows. Cut it down in the Fall and it comes up pretty and fresh in the Spring! What a deal.

Along with Nettles, Sorrel is a terrific cleansing herb. The French make Salmon with Sorrel Sauce. Too good. Eastern Europeans feast on Schav, a cold soup.
Here is how to make it:

Pick a big bunch of some fresh Springtime Sorrel. You can’t have too much. Wash it very well and remove any tough stems. Drop in a peeled onion and bring to a boil. Let is simmer about 20 minutes. Turn off the heat and let it sit for another 20 minutes. The Sorrel will wither away and almost melt. You could take out the onion altogether or chop it up and put it back, whichever way is fine. Beat a couple of eggs then temper them with some of the hot soup. Keep beating the eggs and add the soup gradually so it doesn’t curdle. Then stir the egg mixture back into the soup, while stirring the soup. You can whisk in some yogurt or sour cream at this point, or you could have added it to the beaten eggs. Either way. Let cool then chill well in the refrigerator.

Possible additions and garnishes for each bowl: a boiled new potato, chopped cucumber, a hard-boiled egg, chives, chopped scallion, and a floating dollup of sour cream or yogurt or crème fraiche.


Drink it in a bowl or a glass. You know Spring is really here!!

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