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Award-winning Chef Phyllis Segura has cooked for people in all walks of life both in the U.S. and E.U. Chef Phyllis has been cooking for special people since 2000.
She attended the Apicius Cooking School of Lorenzo de’Medici in Florence, Italy; received a James Beard Foundation scholarship; attended various New York cooking schools; and watched her grandmother very carefully.
As a personal and private chef Phyllis cooks for individual clients and offers cooking demonstrations regularly. She specializes in small elegant dinner parties, and intimate dinners - plated or buffet, weekday meals and private and group culinary instructions.
The chef prepares a wide variety of cuisines. Whereas a restaurant chef might have a specialty that is served daily, as a personal or private chef Segura applies her skills to the requirements and palates of her clients. Fresh and seasonal ingredients make the best dishes. She is not shy with herbs and spices and will go out of her way to source ingredients.

Vegetarian, Vegan, Macrobiotic, Kosher, grain-free, dairy-free, gluten-free, blood type, diabetic and other special diets are available. Chef prefers to use organic, pesticide and antibiotic free, non-GMO and local products as much as possible.
Consultations with nutritionists are recommended for special needs and diets for proper guidelines.

References and a rate sheet are available. She currently lives in Saugerties, NY.
In 2013 she offered cooking classes in her home kitchen in Spencertown,NY www.reddoorcookingworkshop.blogspot.com

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Tuesday, April 14, 2015

THE BOMBAY WRAP

I created this today and you might like it. If you don't live near an Indian grocery store you might want to take a trip to one first.

THE BOMBAY WRAP

I used an Ajwain Paratha for this wrap. I don’t find those large tortilla things found on the grocery shelves to be edible. It bewilders me how can something last that long on a shelf and still be good for you. Ajwain is not a seed though it looks like caraway and cumin, but a fruit pod. Its flavor is similar to oregano and anise and it’s used in a similar way as an anti-flatulent. I found some in the refrigerator of an Indian grocer in Albany, NY. Two come in a package. So this recipe serves 2.

3 scallions, white and green parts, sliced
2 carrots, grated
1 bunch lacinato kale, de-stemmed
1-2 tablespoons olive oil
Bulgarian feta
Zatar, optional
Black pepper, optional

Steam the kale leaves until they wilt with just the water on the rinsed leaves. Let cool slightly, then rough chop.

Heat a non-stick pan to medium-high and warm the olive oil. Add the scallions to sauté 1-2 minutes. Add the grated carrots, sauté another minute. Then add the chopped kale and sauté, stirring, until the kale is cooked through. You might need to add a bit more olive oil. Sprinkle with a pinch of zatar and a grinding of black pepper. You don’t need any salt because the feta is very salty.


Warm a cast iron pan and heat the paratha on both sides. Transfer to a plate. Place the kale mixture in the center of the paratha and sprinkle some crumbled feta cheese on top. Roll and serve.


Paratha with Kale, Scallions, Carrot & Feta




I already took a bit out of it.